"Amennyiben valaki inna a koriander vészes és nehezen gyógyítható italából..." egy nikandrosi részlet elemzése /

Nicander of Colophon (a poet, who presumably lived in the second century BC) wrote his works – like the one which has the title Alexipharmaca - as a hellenistic author. The didactic poem of poisons and their antidotes is not without the character of catalogue, neither the plentiful structure of allu...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Szilágyi Laura Menta
Corporate Author: Collegium Hungaricum Societatis Europaeae Studiosorum Philologiae Classicae : Országos konferencia
Other Authors: Nikandrosz
Format: Book part
Published: 2013
Series:Enargeia : a Collegium Hungaricum Societatis Europaeae Studiosorum Philologiae Classicae VII. Országos Konferenciáján elhangzott előadások
Kulcsszavak:Gyógyítás - mérgek - ókor, Görög irodalom története - ókor
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Online Access:http://acta.bibl.u-szeged.hu/71401
Description
Summary:Nicander of Colophon (a poet, who presumably lived in the second century BC) wrote his works – like the one which has the title Alexipharmaca - as a hellenistic author. The didactic poem of poisons and their antidotes is not without the character of catalogue, neither the plentiful structure of allusions, references and linguistic plays. Due to these, not just the external form is an instrument of intellectual entertainment, but new shades of meaning are added to the content. In the fourth place between the poisonous matters of the epic poem there is the coriander, which has recieved various judgement in ancient medicine. In the Alexipharmaca, as we can see, the coriander is a poison, but in Nicander's other poem about poisonous animals and antidotes, in the Theriaca, this plant appears as a curative basic material. If we look around in the ancient Greek literature, the image of the coriander will be more subtle. Nicander inserts the coriander in his poem so that it is seemingly a description about the dangerous effects of the plant, and a list of the antidote's ingredients. However, owing to the usage, some expressions and grammatical forms, there are many allusions hidden in the lines which can be understood only by cultured readers: allusions to mythology (sometimes to lesser-known myths), to poet-predecessors or to contemporary authors. Even in the first five lines the shape of Bacchus and the evocation of the metamorphosed Io's myth can be recognized. Nicander, while introduces stealthily further and further meanings in the attentional coriander-passage, produces quite an effect on the later.
Physical Description:72-77
ISBN:978-963-306-199-2