A szakrális viasz, különös tekintettel a húsvéti gyertyára

Wax candles have been in use since the Roman era: candles were burnt at the antique statues of gods as well as at graves. This practice carried an apotropaic meaning: in Christianity, the candle symbolizes Christ, the Light of the World. The wax itself also represents the birth of Jesus from a virgi...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Szilárdfy Zoltán
Corporate Author: Szegedi Vallási Néprajzi Konferencia (8.) (2006) (Szeged)
Format: Book part
Published: 2009
Series:Szegedi vallási néprajzi könyvtár 22
Érzékek és vallás 22
Kulcsszavak:Népi vallásosság, Liturgia - keresztény, Hitélet - keresztény, Vallásosság
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Online Access:http://acta.bibl.u-szeged.hu/70420
Description
Summary:Wax candles have been in use since the Roman era: candles were burnt at the antique statues of gods as well as at graves. This practice carried an apotropaic meaning: in Christianity, the candle symbolizes Christ, the Light of the World. The wax itself also represents the birth of Jesus from a virgin. This view explains the use of altar candles in liturgy outside this practical usage. However, the wax also symbolizes the heart of Jesus stabbed with the spear (Psalms 21,15b). The earliest evidence for the consecration of candles is from the 10th century. In certain parts of the area of Western Christianity (e.g. Rome), candle processions have been held as early as the 8th century. The candle there symbolized the infant Jesus, whom the elderly Simeon took into his arms, and called a light to lighten the Gentiles. Here, wax is a reminder of Jesus' human nature, and the candle light, of his divinity. In moral terms, the candle symbolizes faith and good deeds. The most prominent ancient symbol of Christ is the Easter candle and the candelabrum is considered to symbolize the Virgin Mary. The relic wax medal Agnus Dei is also made from an Easter candle. It has been associated with the Roman popes for centuries, as every seventh year, the pope personally handed out such wax medals made from the remains of the Easter candle. In nunneries, wax statues of the infantJesus were common, butsome of them came to be venerated as relics. The InfantJesus of Prague, associated with Saint Teresa of Avila, is one of the most well-known such relic, also made of wax.
Physical Description:189-196
ISBN:978 963 482 973 7
ISSN:1419-1288