Lengyel rendszerváltás - magyar rendszerváltás Magyarország a mai lengyel sajtóban - húsz évvel a rendszerváltozás után /

Commemorating the anniversary of the political change in Central and Eastern Europe in his lectures, Piotr Kowalczyk presents an account of how Hungary's economic and political steps have been represented in the Polish media during the last 20 years. He starts his lectures by evoking the famous...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Kowalczyk Piotr
Corporate Author: Konferencia a rendszerváltozásokról (2009) (Szeged)
Format: Book part
Published: 2010
Series:Szakkollégiumi füzetek 5
'89 rendszerváltozások Kelet-Európában : konferenciakötet 5
Kulcsszavak:Politikai változások - Magyarország - 21. sz., Politikai változások - Lengyelország - 21. sz.
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Online Access:http://acta.bibl.u-szeged.hu/5582
Description
Summary:Commemorating the anniversary of the political change in Central and Eastern Europe in his lectures, Piotr Kowalczyk presents an account of how Hungary's economic and political steps have been represented in the Polish media during the last 20 years. He starts his lectures by evoking the famous Polish-Hungarian friendship, talks about how the two countries have shared a common interest in each other for centuries, discusses the details of the political change in both countries, and considers how Poland and Hungary have attempted to direct their policies and economies during the past two decades. Kowalczyk comments on how the Polish Solidaritas had an effect on the development of the Hungarian opposition at that time. After this introduction Kowalczyk considers exactly how Hungary was represented from year to year by the Polish press. He suggests that the Polish people show an extraordinary interest in economic and political events in Hungary, and he tries to prove this by presenting points from a series of articles. He analyzes Hungary's economic and political conditions from the beginning of the political change to the present day by quoting several Polish articles and interviews. Over the course of his analysis it turns out that in Poland a negative image of Hungary was formed in relation to certain events: its economic crisis, social conflicts and tension, social dissatisfaction, countermovements against gipsy people, the utterances of extreme right parties, the Hungarian Guard, and serious problems in internal affairs. So the image of Hungary coming from the Polish press is quite pessimistic, and even at times disapproving. Therefore, Kowalczyk visualizes quite a negative future for Hungary in his lectures.
Physical Description:42-49
ISSN:1586-8036