Az öt érzékszerv liturgiája a keleti egyházban

The idea thatthe East thinks in terms ofthe whole person plays an important part in the promotion of the five senses. The West, and especially Roman Catholicism, is inclined towards rationalism and intellectualism; this is why the arts are nothing more than illustration. Protestantism has limited th...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Cselényi István
Corporate Author: Szegedi Vallási Néprajzi Konferencia (8.) (2006) (Szeged)
Format: Book part
Published: 2009
Series:Szegedi vallási néprajzi könyvtár 22
Érzékek és vallás 22
Kulcsszavak:Népi vallásosság, Érzékelés - pszichológia - vallásosság
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Online Access:http://acta.bibl.u-szeged.hu/70406
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Summary:The idea thatthe East thinks in terms ofthe whole person plays an important part in the promotion of the five senses. The West, and especially Roman Catholicism, is inclined towards rationalism and intellectualism; this is why the arts are nothing more than illustration. Protestantism has limited the scope of religious experience exclusively to the verbal element as its form of expression, thus, similarly to Jewish or Islamic policies of iconoclasm and ban of images, it banished the visual element, the image of man, from its churches. Eastern Christianity wants to grasp man with all five senses, and not only statically, but in motion. This is why we speak not only of the liturgy of the word, but of the song, image, space, motion, even smell and taste, and in general of the elements of emotions and volitional attunement, besides rational considerations. Beyond this dissimilarity East and West are further divided by the difference in their metaphysics. In Western metaphysics, the form is merely the external signifier of the inner content. The philosophy of the Western Church rather follows the categories of Aristotle, where corporeal beings are composed from materia andforma, the material and the substantial, inner form (forma substantialis), while the external form (forma secundaria) is manifest in accidents and adjuncts. It is no wonder that in modem languages, accident means misfortune, clash and coincidence. In Western thinking, the external elements speaking to the senses are in fact only adjuncts, a negligible surplus; the essence of things is provided by the inner, rational content. Basically, this perspective has shaped the relationship of the substantial meaning of faith to representation and artistic instruments, and this is what we see to this day in the duality of concepts in literature and other forms of art, in the separation of content and form, where form is only an external and formal element.
Physical Description:34-42
ISBN:978 963 482 973 7
ISSN:1419-1288