"Selmectől Sopronig" a Soproni Egyetem diákhagyományai mint átmeneti rítusok /

The roots of Hungarian mining and forestry higher education go back to Selmecbánya (today Banska Stiavnica, Slovakia). The Mining Officer Training Institute, founded in 1735, grew to be a College and moved to Sopron in 1919. The college traditions developing and flourishing in Selmecbánya were prese...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Méri Edina
Format: Book part
Published: 2004
Series:Szegedi vallási néprajzi könyvtár 13
Rítusok, folklór szövegek 13
Kulcsszavak:Diákszokások - Magyarország - története, Diákélet - Magyarország - története, Felsőoktatás - Magyarország - regionális
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Online Access:http://acta.bibl.u-szeged.hu/69899
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Summary:The roots of Hungarian mining and forestry higher education go back to Selmecbánya (today Banska Stiavnica, Slovakia). The Mining Officer Training Institute, founded in 1735, grew to be a College and moved to Sopron in 1919. The college traditions developing and flourishing in Selmecbánya were preserved and enriched with some new elements. The college traditions known as the „Heritage of Selmec" which are present all through college life represent a characteristic group of customs. Within the group, the separation, transition and incorporation rites are recognizable forming clearly distinguishable groups. Thus, they can be interpreted using the theory of the rites of passage developed by Arnold van Gennep and Victor Turner. The separation and transition rites begin at the end of secondary school with an initiation ceremony (the ribbon-ceremony) and the farewell parade and continue with the rites incorporating students into the university system (receiving freshmen, educating freshmen, freshman exam, freshman baptism). Since the structure of the university is hierarchical, the student gains higher status in the body of students as he makes progress with his studies. These stages are also marked by rites. The end of university life is foreshadowed again by separation and transition rites, the ribbon-ceremony, the jug-ceremony, finally, further separation rites confirm the parting from the institution. The function of the rites is to help graduates to become grown- up, to prepare them for persistence in work, to „teach" them team-spirit and the rules of community life. The scope of my research can be widened to the period after graduation concerning the whole life of the individual, as the established community will not dissolve, but it is confirmed at the events of social evenings and reunions. One such occasion is when the last honour is paid to the individual with a funeral ceremony preserved as a mining tradition which is followed by a funeral banquet of old fellow-students.
Physical Description:183-194
ISBN:963 9406 78 3
ISSN:1419-1288